Grow Youthful: How to Slow Your Aging and Enjoy Extraordinary Health
Grow Youthful: How to Slow Your Aging and Enjoy Extraordinary Health

Angina pectoris

What is angina?

Symptoms of angina

Causes of angina

Triggers of angina

Prevention / remedies / treatment for angina

References

What is angina?

Angina pectoris is temporary chest pain or feeling of pressure due to lack of blood (and therefore oxygen) to the heart muscle. The main cause of angina is coronary artery disease, when the blood flow in the coronary arteries (the heart's blood vessels) is obstructed by calciferous deposits or a spasm.

Stable angina (effort angina) is the most common, and exhibits no or minimal symptoms when at rest. Activity such as walking or running brings on chest pain or discomfort, and other symptoms.

Unstable angina can occur at rest, or with minimal exertion. It has usually first occurred in the last 4-6 weeks. It occurs in a crescendo pattern lasting more than 10 minutes, and is distinctly more severe, prolonged, or frequent than previously. Nearly two thirds of unstable anginas occur between 10 PM and 8 AM when patients are at rest. It is a serious indicator of an impending heart attack and needs urgent medical attention.

Microvascular angina is characterized by angina-like chest pain, but is not caused by arterial blockages. The cause is not clear, but it is probably not particularly harmful.

Chest pain lasting only a few seconds is not normally angina.

About 6.3 million Americans experience angina, with a similar rate in the rest of the affluent Western world. The first attack occurs on average at the age of 62. Five years after the first occurrence nearly 5% of individuals die from coronary heart disease, with men more affected than women. (1)

Symptoms of angina

Causes of angina

Triggers of angina

Prevention / remedies / treatment for angina

References

1. Buckley B, Simpson CR, McLernon DJ, et al. Five year prognosis in patients with angina identified in primary care: incident cohort study. 2009, BMJ 339: b3058. doi:10.1136/bmj.b3058. PMID 19661139.