Grow Youthful: How to Slow Your Aging and Enjoy Extraordinary Health
Grow Youthful: How to Slow Your Aging and Enjoy Extraordinary Health

Fish, seafood and you colon

A large 22 year study (1) looked at fish and seafood in the diets of men, and discovered that those who eat fish, shrimp, prawns and other seafood have a 40% lower chance of colon or rectal cancer.

The researchers were not sure why frequently eating fish has such a protective effect on you colon health. They made a couple of suggestions: first, that the omega-3 essential fatty acids and the vitamin D in fish might protect you. Second, they suggested that it could simply be that fish lovers eat less red meat - something known to raise colon cancer risk.

I feel that many studies (2) that suggest that red meat can cause cancer miss the most important point. Yes, meat from sick animals will raise your cancer risk. Animals that are held in pens and feedlots, and fed on foods other than their natural (or wild) diet, and injected or fed drugs and chemicals, produce meat, milk and eggs with a damaged nutritional profile.

However, meat from wild or healthfully grown animals will not raise colon cancer risks. Just one of many examples of this is the traditional peoples from the far northern parts of the world who ate caribou and other red meats as a large part of their diet.

Unfortunately, virtually all the research I have read on the health affects of different foods does NOT take into account the quality of the foods studied. Most researchers assume that organic, free range or wild foods are the same as farmed, mass-produced, chemically produced foods.

Here are some warnings concerning fish:

References

1. Hall, M. N. et al. A 22-year prospective study of fish, n-3 fatty acid intake, and colorectal cancer risk in men, Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention 2008 May;17(5):1136-1143.

2. Veronique Bouvard, Dana Loomis, Kathryn Z Guyton, Yann Grosse, Fatiha El Ghissassi, Lamia Benbrahim-Tallaa, Neela Guha, Heidi Mattock, Kurt Straif. Carcinogenicity of consumption of red and processed meat. The Lancet Oncology, Published Online: 26 October 2015.