Grow Youthful: How to Slow Your Aging and Enjoy Extraordinary Health
Grow Youthful: How to Slow Your Aging and Enjoy Extraordinary Health

Digestive enzymes

Types of digestive enzymes

Digestive enzymes benefits and uses

Sources of digestive enzymes

References

Types of digestive enzymes

Digestive enzymes are produced in the mouth, stomach, pancreas, small intestine and large intestine. A vast range of other enzymes are also produced around the body, and they are involved in virtually every biological process.

Dr Edward Howell (1) argues that the unnecessary, unnatural and unabated depletion of the body's enzyme production is "one of the paramount causes of premature aging and early death" and "the underlying cause of almost all degenerative disease." "When it gets to the point that you can't make certain enzymes, then your life ends."

Most raw foods contain their own digestive enzymes, which assist with their own digestion. When raw foods are heated much above body temperature, these enzymes are destroyed. Pasteurised foods and drinks, and most processed foods are enzyme-dead. If you eat mostly processed enzyme-dead food, it is difficult to stay slim and healthy. The active enzymes in raw foods assist your digestive system to extract all the nutrients from the food, and you will feel less hungry. Unless your digestive system is in perfect condition (a rare occurrence), the food digests slowly and partially. Incompletely digested food provides a medium for harmful bacteria, yeasts and parasites to thrive. Indigestion and gas are the early warnings. The fat that accumulates around the stomach, upper thighs, neck, major lymph nodes and other bulging parts of the body contains a high level of these partially digested fat-soluble toxins.

If you eat a diet based on just a few foods, you may deplete the supply of specific digestive enzymes. This is typical of the standard American diet, which is based on just a few foods like potatoes, tomatoes, beef, sugar and wheat.

Digestive enzymes benefits and uses

Sources of digestive enzymes

Typical digestive enzyme supplements contain protease, lipase, amylase, glucoamylase, invertase, alpha-galactosidase, malt diastase, cellulase, bromelain and papain.

Store supplements in a cool, dry place. A single, short instance of heating these enzymes much above body temperature can destroy them completely.

References

1. Howell, Edward. Enzyme Nutrition. 1986.