Grow Youthful: How to Slow Your Aging and Enjoy Extraordinary Health
Grow Youthful: How to Slow Your Aging and Enjoy Extraordinary Health

Lymphatic enzymes

The lymphatic system

Lymph nodes

Lymphatic congestion

Cautions when taking lymphatic enzyme supplements

How to assist the movement of lymph fluid

The lymphatic system

The lymphatic system is the body's cellular-waste removal system; it also plays an essential role in the immune system. It is a circulatory system made up of lymphatic vessels. There is 4 - 5 times more lymph fluid than blood in the body. These vessels carry a clear fluid called lymph from the body's extremities to two valves called lymphatic ducts, which empty into the subclavian veins under the armpits near the collar bones.

Lymph fluid starts from the interstitial fluid - the solution that surrounds most cells. It collects through lymph capillaries, moves though lymph vessels to lymph nodes before emptying into the subclavian veins where it mixes back with blood.

The lymphatic system is not pumped by the heart. Instead, lymph fluid is moved along the vessels by peristaltic contraction of the smooth muscle which surrounds the lymphatic vessels. Skeletal muscles also move the lymph fluid. As you walk, breathe and move, the muscle contraction and relaxation pumps along the lymph fluid.

Lymph nodes

The lymphatic system also connects lymph nodes, which are widely distributed throughout the body including the armpit and digestive tract. Lymph nodes are part of the immune system, holding B and T cells, and white blood cells called lymphocytes and macrophages. Lymph nodes also act as filters or traps for foreign particles. There are over 600 lymph nodes around your body, including your tonsils. If you are fighting an infection, some of these nodes can feel swollen.

The lymphatic system is an important cleaning system. As well as removing cellular waste and other toxins from the body, it returns undigested protein, fat and carbohydrates and excess interstitial fluid back into blood circulation. Lymph may pick up bacteria and bring them to lymph nodes where they are destroyed by white blood cells. The lymph system also moves cerebrospinal fluid.

Lymphatic congestion

Undigested particles of carbohydrate and protein can get into the interstitial fluid. They tend to form relatively large particles, blocking entry to the lymphatic vessels, and being too big to be used by the cells for food. This lymphatic congestion causes general aging and ill health, with symptoms of numbness, spasticity, or paralysis of varying degrees.

There is evidence that lymphatic congestion is associated with various cancers, particularly breast cancer, and possibly prostate cancer. However, pharmaceutical companies and medical associations have little financial incentive to research in this direction.

To stop the problem occurring in the first place, it is necessary to ensure that the food you eat is properly digested. The production of enzymes for the digestion of food is a heavy tax on your body. Digestive enzymes relieve the workload on the pancreas, and free up other reserve enzymes that are needed elsewhere for good health.

Lymphatic cleaning enzymes were first formulated by Dr Edward Howell (the deceased author of Enzyme Nutrition), with the purpose of digesting away years of accumulation of these large mucoprotein particles or starch-protein conjugates in the intercellular spaces.

You can buy vegetable and fungal-derived enzyme supplements to enhance your digestion, especially for those who have been on a processed or dead-food diet, the elderly or those who have weak digestion.

Lymphatic enzymes and digestive enzymes are two different supplement formulations, and they are used in different ways. You take digestive enzymes with a meal, and they are formulated to help with the digestion of that food. In contrast, lymphatic enzymes are a stronger formulation which contain a much larger amount of protease. You take lymphatic enzymes between meals rather than with food.

Cautions when taking lymphatic enzyme supplements

How to assist the movement of lymph fluid