Grow Youthful: How to Slow Your Aging and Enjoy Extraordinary Health
Grow Youthful: How to Slow Your Aging and Enjoy Extraordinary Health

Seborrhoeic dermatitis

What is seborrhoeic dermatitis?

Symptoms of seborrhoeic dermatitis

Cradle cap

Causes of seborrhoeic dermatitis

Prevention / remedies / treatment for seborrhoeic dermatitis

References

What is seborrhoeic dermatitis?

Seborrhoeic dermatitis (cradle cap, seborrheic dermatitis, seborrhea, seborrheic eczema) is a common, inflammatory skin condition that causes thick flaky, white to yellowish scales to form on the scalp, inside the ear and other oily parts of the body that have sebaceous-gland-rich areas of skin. It can occur with or without reddened skin. Seborrheic dermatitis appears to run in families.

In adults, it can last from a few weeks to many years.

Cradle cap is the term used when seborrheic dermatitis affects the scalp of infants (though cradle cap also occurs in adults).

Do not confuse seborrheic dermatitis with psoriasis, which presents as large, dry, thick, well-defined silvery scales.

Symptoms of seborrhoeic dermatitis

Cradle cap

This is a form of seborrheic dermatitis in infants. Cradle cap is a harmless, temporary condition that is not contagious, nor is it caused by poor hygiene. It appears as thick, crusty, yellow or brown scales on the baby's scalp, eyelids, ears, nose and groin. It can occur in newborns and small children up to age 3.

Nappy / diaper rash often accompanies cradle cap.

Cradle cap usually resolves within days and with no treatment.

Cradle cap may or may not itch. If it itches, excessive scratching may cause inflammation, and breaks in skin can cause mild infections or bleeding.

Cradle cap may be caused by an excess of vitamin A, or a lack of some B vitamins (B2, B6, B7).

Causes of seborrhoeic dermatitis

Prevention / remedies / treatment for seborrhoeic dermatitis

References

1. Habif TP. Clinical Dermatology. 5th ed. 2009.

2. Wikler JR, Janssen N, Bruynzeel DP, Nieboer C. The effect of UV-light on pityrosporum yeasts: ultrastructural changes and inhibition of growth. 1990. Acta Dermato-venereologica 70 (1): 69-71.

3. Satchell AC, Saurajen A, Bell C, Barnetson RS. Treatment of dandruff with 5% tea tree oil shampoo. December 2002. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 47 (6): 852-5.