Grow Youthful: How to Slow Your Aging and Enjoy Extraordinary Health
Grow Youthful: How to Slow Your Aging and Enjoy Extraordinary Health

Coconut oil

What is coconut oil?

Composition of coconut oil

Coconut oil properties

Digestive benefits

Coconut oil health benefits and remedies

How much coconut oil to use?

Coconut oil warnings

References

What is coconut oil?

Coconut oil is a popular cooking and nutritional oil that you can use in many different ways. It one of the best oils for cooking and baking, is soothing on the skin, and it has various healing properties.

coconut

Coconut oil is made from the flesh of mature coconuts. I visited a small village in the jungle in Indonesia, where an old woman was making coconut oil the traditional way. She scooped the white flesh out of coconuts after cracking them, using a chisel on the end of a large metal rod stuck in the ground. She broke up the flesh in a wok, mixed it with water, and warmed it over a fire. The coconut oil floated to the top, where she scooped it off and bottled it.

Try to buy pure, extra-virgin, unrefined coconut oil, just like that which I described above. It should be clear to having just a faint hint of colour, and should have a delicious "coconut cookie" smell. If it has a brown colour, or smells unpleasant or slightly rancid, avoid it.

Coconut milk or creamed coconut is also a delicious and good way to consume coconut oil. Coconut milk is rich, creamy and widely used in Asian cooking, particularly Thai cooking. Add it to a wide variety of dishes, shakes, soups and sauces. Coconut milk yields about 1 part oil per 4-6 parts milk. Creamed coconut comes in hard blocks, available at Asian stores. It keeps for ages. Try to buy the best quality full-fat coconut milk that has not been tampered with, and is free from added sugars or any other preservatives or additives.

Coconut oil has been the primary cooking oil in the coastal tropics for millennia. Unfortunately cheap vegetable oils (polyunsaturated oils) are now widely available in supermarkets in tropical countries, and the health of the people who use these new manufactured oils is suffering.

Aside from its traditional uses, coconut oil has many industrial and cosmetic applications, which make it a valuable commodity.

Composition of coconut oil

Coconut oil has a reputation as a healthy oil despite the fact that its high saturated fat content was once falsely claimed to be unhealthy. Up to 92% of coconut oil is saturated fat, and around two thirds of those saturated fats are medium chain.

Almost all the fats in a standard Western diet are long-chain triglycerides (LCTs), from which we derive long-chain fatty acids (LCFA). In fact about 98% of the fats in the average person's diet are LCTs, including those from meat, eggs, vegetables and various "vegetable" oils. There are only a few dietary sources of medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) or medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs). Coconut oil is by far the richest source of MCTs. Butter and whole milk also contain small amounts. The other rich source of MCTs is human breast milk.

Coconut oil is different from all other oils (except palm kernel oil) because it is mostly MCTs. These MCTs comprise 50% lauric acid, 8% caprylic acid, and 7% capric acid.

Lauric acid (monolaurin). Coconut oil has many health benefits which are attributed to the lauric acid it contains. The human body converts lauric acid into monolaurin, a compound that is toxic to viruses, bacteria, funguses and other microorganisms because of its ability to damage their lipid membranes. Lauric acid is non-toxic to animals, making it a better alternative than pharmaceutical drugs that are typically prescribed for viral, fungal and bacterial infections. (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)

Coconut oil, palm kernel oil and human breast milk are the only significant sources of lauric acid. Small quantities are also found in cows and goats milk. Without lauric acid, monolaurin cannot be produced by the body. This is one of the reasons why breast-fed infants are so less prone to infections, and why regular consumption of coconut oil boosts immunity and reduces incidences of sickness.

Caprylic acid, another of the fatty acids in coconut oil, has potent antibacterial and antifungal properties. (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)

Coconut oil properties

Digestive benefits

Good news for those with digestive problems. MCTs are much easier to digest than other fats. Coconut oil digests without needing bile, so people who have had gallbladder surgery can use it without fear. People who tell me they could only handle a very small amount of fat without it causing them discomfort say they can consume a couple of tablespoons of coconut oil per day without any problems, once they get used to it.

Anyone who has difficulty digesting fats can benefit from using coconut oil. This includes those who suffer from cystic fibrosis, infants, and especially those who have had gallbladder surgery. The loss of the gallbladder makes it difficult to digest fat. The gallbladder collects and holds bile secreted by the liver. If you eat a meal containing LCT fat, the gallbladder empties into the intestinal tract. The bile emulsifies the LCT fat so digestive enzymes can effectively break it down. Without a gallbladder, there no longer is a reservoir of bile. The liver continues to make bile but instead of collecting in the gallbladder it constantly drains into the intestinal tract. So a small amount of bile is present most of the time, which can help digest a small amount of fat. Any more fat causes intestinal distress and cramping.

MCTs digest quickly and easily because they do not need bile or pancreatic enzymes for digestion.

When you eat some MCT fat, by the time it leaves the stomach and enters the small intestinal it is already broken down into MCFAs. They are immediately absorbed into the bloodstream through the portal vein and sent straight to the liver. In the liver they are converted to ketones and preferentially used as a source of fuel. MCFAs are used to produce energy, not body fat or fat that collects in artery walls as plaque.

The instant energy fuel increases the metabolic rate, heat production and circulation. MCTs digest so rapidly that they can provide a quick source of nutrition without taxing the enzyme systems of the body.

Coconut oil health benefits and remedies

How much coconut oil to use?

You can eat coconut oil by the spoonful, put it on salads, muesli, or virtually any other food. Use coconut oil in almost any recipe to replace shortening, margarine and other toxic seed oils (vegetable oils).

How much to take varies depending on the individual and particular state of health. If you benefit from taking coconut oil and feeling good using it, you can use a couple of tablespoons per day. Many tropical populations consume several tablespoons per day throughout their lives, with great health and no side-effects. However, if you have previously been on a low-fat diet, or are new to coconut oil, it pays to start slowly and gradually increase the dosage over a period of weeks or months.

In some cases, you can give a tablespoon of coconut oil every 2-3 hours to a sick patient. If a patient gags when anything is put into their mouth, then apply the oil to their skin. Massage it in all over their body, but especially over the area covering their ailment.

Coconut oil warnings

Coconut oil has no known side effects. However, if you are used to a low-fat diet, a common adverse reaction when you first start using it is diarrhoea. If you are not used to having coconut oil in your diet, it is best to start with a little and see how your body reacts.

Pregnancy. In coconut-producing countries it is considered beneficial for pregnant and lactating women to enjoy coconut oil. However, if you have been on a low-fat diet or are new to coconut oil, you are cautioned not to experiment with coconut oil while pregnant if your body is not used to it.

It is possible that coconut oil can cause systemic inflammation. If you suffer from an ailment such as intestinal inflammation or multiple sclerosis it may be worth avoiding coconut oil for a few months, to see if it was the cause.

References

1. Gilda Sapphire Erguiza. American College of Chest Physicians, 29 October 2008.

2. A. Goc, A. Niedzwiecki, M. Rath. In vitro evaluation of antibacterial activity of phytochemicals and micronutrients against Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia garinii. J Appl Microbiol. 2015 Dec; 119(6): 1561-1572. Published online 22 November 2015. doi: 10.1111/jam.12970. PMCID: PMC4738477.

3. Sung Woo Jung, Sang Woo Lee. The antibacterial effect of fatty acids on Helicobacter pylori infection. Korean J Intern Med. 2016 Jan; 31(1): 30-35. Published online 28 December 2015. doi: 10.3904/kjim.2016.31.1.30. PMCID: PMC4712431.

4. Sun CQ, O'Connor CJ, Roberton AM. Antibacterial actions of fatty acids and monoglycerides against Helicobacter pylori. FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 2003 May 15;36(1-2):9-17.

5. Bartolotta S, Garcia CC, Candurra NA, Damonte EB. Effect of fatty acids on arenavirus replication: inhibition of virus production by lauric acid. Arch Virol. 2001;146(4):777-90.

6. Teruaki Nakatsuji, Mandy C. Kao, Jia-You Fang, Christos C. Zouboulis, Liangfang Zhang, Richard L. Gallo, Chun-Ming Huang. Antimicrobial Property of Lauric Acid Against Propionibacterium acnes: Its Therapeutic Potential for Inflammatory Acne Vulgaris. J Invest Dermatol. 2009 Oct; 129(10): 2480-2488. Published online 2009 Apr 23. doi: 10.1038/jid.2009.93. PMCID: PMC2772209.

7. Carpo BG, Verallo-Rowell VM, Kabara J. Novel antibacterial activity of monolaurin compared with conventional antibiotics against organisms from skin infections: an in vitro study. J Drugs Dermatol. 2007 Oct;6(10):991-8.